Lovely Lannion

Visit Bretagne.com was the main site we used to research  different regions of Brittany. Categorized by interests and activities, we found it very helpful. It led us to coincide our foray with Lannion Thursday market at the lively town center located by the river Le Léguer. Parking by the picturesque riverbank lined with yellowing autumn trees, we followed the crowd towards the white canopied stalls passing through the typical shoes then clothing and knickknacks tables, onto the produce aisles with vibrantly colored produces, then to the appetizing food trucks. We stopped first at a covered market for a taste of tea and Breton crêpe of almond butter. Crêpe is a Breton specialty and was offered everywhere in Brittany. It’s like eating dessert for your main meal. We also tried Breton cidre and found it light and refreshing, less sweet than apple cider in the U.S. At Lannion market, we bought some unusual looking figs, sweet cherry tomatoes and pears and finally a baguette. All the while gazing up at the lovely medieval buildings around the Place du Génerál- LeClerc. Passing the long line waiting at the Vietnamese food truck, we chatted up with a local woman at the bread stall. Actually the native Frenchie, VH, was doing the talking with QN listening and me following French words here and there. We discussed upcoming areas to visit and she gave us a thumb up for Dinan. As we bid her au revoir, she told us to look her up next time we visit Lannion. Charmed! On the way back to the car, we detoured to a patisserie for canelé and butter croissant. Smiling and with market loot in tow we headed back and found DD napping in the front seat, awaken just in time to enjoy an impromptu picnic-in-the-car with a beautiful view of the river. Sated after a nice lunch we drove back to Pont Melvez so QN can discuss renovation on her dream house. After all, we were brought here for that important reason. Now I  was truly excited  to see this house.

Slate house,on the left and half-timbered house , on right, were from 15-16th century.

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